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A classic moorland walk


On Monday 2nd May, Richard Medland, one of our guides who has been guiding for the festival since it started some 16 years ago, checked out his walk over Anstey Common the other day. As is often the case when you walk alone over Exmoor, you are inspired to write about it. Richard went into verse, and his poem described perfectly what one can see when walking over Exmoor’s open moors.


I went out for a walk today, the weather being dry

From Molland up to Ridgeway Cross, then southward by and by

When north along the bridleway ten red deer I did spy

They knew me there, took fright and ran, and eastward they did fly.

A second herd in Triss Combe, some stags among these too

To take in all their handsome form seemed the best thing to do.

They scented me, and watched with care as I sat down to eat;

My bread and cheese while watching them was something of a treat!

Down Triss Combe and up Smallacombe, then Anstey Gate and down,

The peat at White Moor badly poached not only from the rain:

A herd of dark beef cattle (too many I should think)

Up on the high ground grazing; they had made the way to sink.

I looked in at old Brimblecombe, where Grandad used to farm;

I met a Mr Lock there, and we stopped and had a yarn.

He told me of his family, at Hawkridge a long line

And living near East Anstey it turns out that he knows mine.

On down to Bremley and the mines, where iron and copper ore

Were laboured to the surface for a hundred years and more.

My walk seemed long and tiring, I was glad to see my car

I had reached the Inn of London too early for the bar.

I stopped off at the Blackcock Inn; young barman, quiet chap

The bar was full of Londoners, and they were full of yap.

And so my day was over; tired out but free of pain

So I’ll don my boots tomorrow, and do it all again!


If you would like to book onto Richard’s walk then go to the festival website at to book your place on walk 2B – The Beauty of Molland.

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